History of the PLC or Programmable Logic Controller

The PLC or programmable logic controller was created because of the needs of the American automotive manufacturing industry. Programmable logic controllers were originally adopted by the automotive industry where changing software replaced the re-wiring of hard-wired control panels when production needs changed.

Prior to the PLC, sequencing, control, and safety interlock logic for manufacturing automobiles was done by using hundreds or thousands of cam timers, relays, and drum sequencers as well as dedicated closed-loop controllers. Electricians needed to individually rewire all relays. Updating these facilities for the yearly model switch-over was extremely time consuming and quite expensive.

In 1968 GM Hydramatic, the automatic transmission division of General Motors, issued a request for proposal for an electronic replacement for their hard-wired relay systems. A winning proposal came from Bedford Associates of Bedford, Massachusetts was designated the 084 because it was Bedford Associates’ eighty-fourth project. UPon successful deployment of their newly invented devices, Bedford Associates started a new company dedicated to this new product: Modicon, which stood for MOdular DIgital CONtroller.

The automotive industry is still one of the largest users of PLCs and PQBattery is one of the main suppliers of the batteries that store the programs that run programmable logic controllers.

This entry was posted in Battery Info, PLC Batteries and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s